Health Issues
Health Issues
Health Issues
Home | Health Diseases | Skin Disorders | Home Remedies | Get Rid of Stuffs | Rare Diseases | Health Blog | Contact Us

Allergic Contact Dermatitis - Symptoms & Treatment


Allergic contact dermatitis is a deferred hypersensitivity effect (the reaction to the allergen arises 48-72 hours after exposure). A lot of different substances can induce allergic contact dermatitis, which are called 'allergens'. Generally these substances cause no problem for most people, and may not even be discern the first time the person is exposed. But once the skin becomes susceptible or allergic to the substance, any exposure will produce a rash. Allergic contact dermatitis is not typically induced by things similar to acid, alkali, solvent, strong soap or detergent. These insensitive compounds, which can generate a reaction on anyone's skin, are identified as 'irritants'. About 20% of people in the United States are possibly at risk of allergic contact dermatitis due to skin sensitivity to as a minimum one common chemical allergen.

Causes of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Some causes & risk factors of Allergic Contact Dermatitis are as follows:

  • Substance in rubber, leather (e.g. chrome) and dyes (e.g. paraphenylenediamine).
  • Creams and ointments applied on the skin.
  • Dry air can dispose to allergic contact dermatitis.
  • Patients among a history of eczema.

Symptoms of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

The dermatitis is usually confined to the site of contact with the allergen, while severe cases may expand outer the contact area or it may become generalised. The itch can increase into a part of redness with inflammation and even tiny blisters that weep. In distinction to irritant contact dermatitis, the effect can enlarge beyond or arise in a dissimilar place from the site of contact. Rarely, the look is that of urticaria (severely itchy raised red patches or wheals that can be similar to insect bites, while these may be more uneven in shape). Seldom, swelling of the mouth and upper airways can arise, which is identified as angioedema. This is grave and requires vital medical attention.

Treatment of Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Some most common treatment for Allergic Contact Dermatitis are as follows:

  • Emollient creams.
  • Topical steroids are very useful and harmless medications when used properly. These work by reducing tenderness of the skin. Topical steroids should be used once or twice on a daily basis to the areas of skin affected by infection.
  • Tacrolimus gel and pimecrolimus cream are immune modulating drugs that reduce calcineurin and may establish useful for allergic contact dermatitis.
  • Corticosteroid may be used to reduce skin irritation.

 

Health Topics
Skin Disorders
Acanthosis Nigricans
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Ascariasis
Atopic Dermatitis
Botulism
Cavernous Hemangioma
Chlamydia
Cholera
Dementia
Dermatitis
Erythroderma
Folliculitis
Gonorrhea
Herpes Simplex
Herpes Zoster
Ichthyosis
Influenza
Leucoderma
Mastocytosis
Molluscum Contagiosum
Mycosis Fungoides
Myxoid Cysts
Nail Fungus
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum
Nummular Dermatitis
Onychomycosis
Onychoschizia
Pfiesteria
Pityriasis Alba
Pityriasis Lichenoides
Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
Plantar Warts
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Pompholyx
Pruritus Ani
Pseudofolliculitis Barbae
Psoriasis
Puffy Eyes
Ehyniophyma
Ring Worm
Rosacea
Scabies
Schambergs Disease
Scleroderma
Sebaceous Hyperplasia
 
Skin Disorders
Anetoderma
Actinomycosis
Acrodermatitis Chronica Atrophicans
Alopecia Mucinosa
Alopecia Areata
Acne Keloidalis
Aspergillosis
Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia
Acrodermatitis Enteropathica
Bacillary Angiomatosis
Blastomycosis North American
Calciphylaxis
Chromomycosis
Chondrodermatitis Nodularis Helicis
Cryptococcosis
Crohns Disease
Erythropoietic Protoporphyria
Dermatofibroma
Eosinophilic Granuloma
Burns
Acanthoma Fissuratum
Erythema Multiforme
Elastosis Perforans Serpiginosa
Erythema Nodosum
Dermatomyositis
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Dermatitis Herpetiformis
Epidermolysis Bullosa
Dyshidrotic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Keratosis
Shingles
Skin Cancer
Solar Keratosis
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stretch Marks
Stye
Sun Burn
Sun Damage
Telogen Effluvium
Tinea Capitis
Tinea Corporis
Tinea Cruris
Tinea Pedis
Tinea Versicolor
Urticaria Pigmentosa
Urticaria
 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © Health-Issues.org. All Rights Reserved.