Health Issues
Health Issues
Health Issues
Home | Health Diseases | Skin Disorders | Home Remedies | Get Rid of Stuffs | Rare Diseases | Health Blog | Contact Us

Alopecia Mucinosa - Symptoms & Treatment


Alopecia Mucinosa is a condition caused because of mucin deposition in hair follicles and sebaceous glands, which undergo epithelial reticular degeneration resulting into follicular papules other plaques related with hair loss. It usually affects the scalp, face, and neck. Alopecia mucinosa is too known as follicular mucinosis, a word also used to describe the look of mucin around hair follicles as seen under the microscope. Mucins look like thready clear or whitish go and in the skin are mainly made up of hyaluronic acid (a common component of the ground substance surrounding collagen in the dermis).

Some other forms of mucinosis are described. Alopecia mucinosa usually presents as vaguely scaly bald patches in which the follicles are unusually prominent. Alopecia mucinosis is distinguished from lymphoma related follicular mucinosis by microscopic assessment and gene rearrangement studies.

Alopecia mucinosa, frequently referred to as follicular mucinosis, was initially reported by Pinkus in 1957. The dermatologic explosions consist of follicular papules and/or indurated plaques that demonstrate distinctive histologic alterations in the hair follicles that lead to hair loss. The accumulation of mucinous material in the injured hair follicles and sebaceous glands creates an inflammatory condition and ensuing degenerative process. For some unidentified reason (thought to be associated to our immune system) cells in the hair follicle generate an abnormal quantity of mucin causing a variety of skin lesions include hair loss (alopecia) and occasionally scarring. It is found in children or adults in the 3rd or 4th decade of life. The adult form tends to have other skin lesions and be final longer than the form usually found in kids.

A variety of cures have been tried with some success but most lesions resolution within months to two years. Urticaria-like follicular mucinosis is very odd. It typically occurs in middle aged men on the head and neck. Red lesions are often seen and hair loss is odd. The disease can final for years and may resolution on its own. It is not thought to be related with any systemic illness.

Causes of Alopecia Mucinosa

Some causes & risk factors of Alopecia Mucinosa are as follows:

  • Cell-mediated immunity.
  • Follicular injure leading to hair loss.
  • Circulating immune complexes.

Symptoms of Alopecia Mucinosa

Some sign and symptoms related to Alopecia Mucinosa are as follows:

  • Hair loss.
  • Reddened plaques other patches on the scalp, face, and neck.
  • These are usually 2-5 cm in diameter but can be larger.

Alopecia Mucinosa Treatment

  • UVA1 phototherapy.
  • Topical nitrogen mustard, and radiation therapy.
  • Topical, intralesional and systemic corticosteroids.
  • Medications such as dapsone, indomethacin, and interferons.
  • Oral antibiotics such as minocycline.

 

Health Topics
Skin Disorders
Acanthosis Nigricans
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Ascariasis
Atopic Dermatitis
Botulism
Cavernous Hemangioma
Chlamydia
Cholera
Dementia
Dermatitis
Erythroderma
Folliculitis
Gonorrhea
Herpes Simplex
Herpes Zoster
Ichthyosis
Influenza
Leucoderma
Mastocytosis
Molluscum Contagiosum
Mycosis Fungoides
Myxoid Cysts
Nail Fungus
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum
Nummular Dermatitis
Onychomycosis
Onychoschizia
Pfiesteria
Pityriasis Alba
Pityriasis Lichenoides
Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
Plantar Warts
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Pompholyx
Pruritus Ani
Pseudofolliculitis Barbae
Psoriasis
Puffy Eyes
Ehyniophyma
Ring Worm
Rosacea
Scabies
Schambergs Disease
Scleroderma
Sebaceous Hyperplasia
 
Skin Disorders
Anetoderma
Actinomycosis
Acrodermatitis Chronica Atrophicans
Alopecia Mucinosa
Alopecia Areata
Acne Keloidalis
Aspergillosis
Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia
Acrodermatitis Enteropathica
Bacillary Angiomatosis
Blastomycosis North American
Calciphylaxis
Chromomycosis
Chondrodermatitis Nodularis Helicis
Cryptococcosis
Crohns Disease
Erythropoietic Protoporphyria
Dermatofibroma
Eosinophilic Granuloma
Burns
Acanthoma Fissuratum
Erythema Multiforme
Elastosis Perforans Serpiginosa
Erythema Nodosum
Dermatomyositis
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Dermatitis Herpetiformis
Epidermolysis Bullosa
Dyshidrotic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Keratosis
Shingles
Skin Cancer
Solar Keratosis
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stretch Marks
Stye
Sun Burn
Sun Damage
Telogen Effluvium
Tinea Capitis
Tinea Corporis
Tinea Cruris
Tinea Pedis
Tinea Versicolor
Urticaria Pigmentosa
Urticaria
 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © Health-Issues.org. All Rights Reserved.