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Botulism - Symptoms & Treatment


Botulism is an uncommon but serious paralytic infection induced by a nerve toxin. There are three most important forms of botulism. Foodborne botulism is induced by eating foods that enclose the botulism toxin. Wound botulism is induced by toxin formed from a wound contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Infant botulism is caused by intense the spores of the botulinum bacteria, which then produce in the intestines and liberate toxin. All forms of botulism can be incurable and are measured medical emergencies. Botulin toxin is one of the most influential known toxins: about one microgram is lethal to humans. It acts by blocking nerve task and escort to respiratory and musculoskeletal paralysis. Most patients finally recover after weeks to months of supportive care.

Botulism is not extending from one person to another. In the United States a mediocre of 110 cases of botulism are reports every year. Of these, just about 25% are food borne, 72% are infant botulism, and the recesses are wound botulism. Outbreaks of food borne botulism concerning two or more persons arise most years. Food borne botulism can arise in all age groups. The toxins formed by clostridium botulinum are the most powerful naturally occurring toxins known to science. They attack the nervous system and source paralysis. Left untreated, the paralysis will extend to the lungs causing breathing failure, followed by death. If treated rapidly, the outlook for somebody with botulism is generally good, as antitoxins have proven very successful in treating the condition.

Causes of Botulism

Some causes & risk factors of Botulism are as follows:

  • Botulism is induced by the bacteria clostridium botulinum.
  • Oil infused through garlic and baked potatoes.
  • Exposure to soil polluted with the bacteria.
  • Botulism may also arise if the organism enters open wounds and generate toxin there.
  • Make use of IV drug (rare occurrence).

Symptoms of Botulism

Some sign and symptoms related to Botulism are as follows:

  • Nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps.
  • Facial failing.
  • Drooping eyelids.
  • Tiredness.
  • Dryness in the throat.
  • Poor feeding and feeble sucking.
  • Slurred speech.

Treatment of Botulism

The most imperative treatment for botulism is supportive care, including assisted breathing using a ventilator for breathing difficulties and intravenous fluids if the patient can't swallow. Botulism will require to be treated with injections of antitoxins. These antitoxins are formed by exposing horses to a form of botulism that they are immune to. This exposure constructs antibodies which are then harvested and used to create an antitoxin. Intravenous fluids can be given to preserve hydration while swallowing difficulties persist and nasogastric feeding (feeding through a tube inserted in the nose) may be begun. In some cases of food-borne botulism, medicines may be used to encourage vomiting in order to eliminate all particles of infected food from the body. Enemas may too be used for this intention.

 

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