Health Issues
Health Issues
Health Issues
Home | Health Diseases | Skin Disorders | Home Remedies | Get Rid of Stuffs | Rare Diseases | Health Blog | Contact Us

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation - Symptoms & Treatment


Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a pathological process in the body wherever the blood begins to coagulate throughout the entire body. DIC occurs in acute and chronic forms. It seen in men and women are equally. The proteins that control blood clotting are unusually active. DIC can occur intensely but also on a slower, chronic base, depending on the underlying difficulty. It is common in the seriously sick, and can participate in the growth of multiple organ failure, which may lead to demise. Risk factors are recent sepsis, recent damage or trauma, recent surgery or anesthesia, difficulties of labor and delivery, leukemia other disseminated cancer, recent blood transfusion response, and severe liver illness.

DIC is most generally observed in serious sepsis and septic shock. Indeed the growth and severity of DIC correlates with death in severe sepsis. Although bacteremia, including both gram-positive and gram-negative organisms, is most commonly related with DIC, other organisms including viruses, fungi, and parasites may reason DIC. Trauma, particularly neurotrauma, is also frequently related with DIC. DIC is more often observed in those patients with trauma who grow the systemic inflammatory response syndrome. DIC mainly occurs within the microcirculation.

Causes of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

Some causes & risk factors of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation are as follows:

  • The main cause of DIC is the unbalance of coagulation and anticoagulation.
  • Thrombohemorrhagic disorder.
  • Irregular blood circulation.
  • The small injury may turn to the DIC.
  • Tissue trauma such as burns, accidents, surgery.

Symptoms of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

Some sign and symptoms related to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation are as follows:

  • Renal failure.
  • Cough and confusion.
  • Decreased platelets.
  • Blood clots.
  • Drop in blood pressure.
  • Sudden bruising.

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treatment

  • Drug-Heparin sodium.
  • Transfusions of blood cells.
  • Surgical treatment is limited to treating certain underlying causes.
  • Activated Protein C is use to control the growth of blood clotts.
  • Cornerstone cure of DIC is the alleviation of the primary disorder.
  • The use of heparin in DIC.
  • Heparin is one of the treatment which use to prevent from bleeding.

Disseminated intravascular coagulation is diagnosed with the assistance of blood trials which are analyzed to count platelets and clotting factors. When a patient presents with excessive bleeding and he or she is at risk for disseminated intravascular coagulation, doctors try to act hastily. Treatment for this condition is very hard. The use of anticoagulant drugs can be helpful, but it can also be very hazardous as it can trigger a bleed that a patient cannot convalesce from. Patients may also obtain transfusions of platelets, and several other drugs can be used, depending on the patient's case.

 

Health Topics
Skin Disorders
Acanthosis Nigricans
Allergic Contact Dermatitis
Ascariasis
Atopic Dermatitis
Botulism
Cavernous Hemangioma
Chlamydia
Cholera
Dementia
Dermatitis
Erythroderma
Folliculitis
Gonorrhea
Herpes Simplex
Herpes Zoster
Ichthyosis
Influenza
Leucoderma
Mastocytosis
Molluscum Contagiosum
Mycosis Fungoides
Myxoid Cysts
Nail Fungus
Necrobiosis Lipoidica Diabeticorum
Nummular Dermatitis
Onychomycosis
Onychoschizia
Pfiesteria
Pityriasis Alba
Pityriasis Lichenoides
Pityriasis Rosea
Pityriasis Rubra Pilaris
Plantar Warts
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Pompholyx
Pruritus Ani
Pseudofolliculitis Barbae
Psoriasis
Puffy Eyes
Ehyniophyma
Ring Worm
Rosacea
Scabies
Schambergs Disease
Scleroderma
Sebaceous Hyperplasia
 
Skin Disorders
Anetoderma
Actinomycosis
Acrodermatitis Chronica Atrophicans
Alopecia Mucinosa
Alopecia Areata
Acne Keloidalis
Aspergillosis
Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia
Acrodermatitis Enteropathica
Bacillary Angiomatosis
Blastomycosis North American
Calciphylaxis
Chromomycosis
Chondrodermatitis Nodularis Helicis
Cryptococcosis
Crohns Disease
Erythropoietic Protoporphyria
Dermatofibroma
Eosinophilic Granuloma
Burns
Acanthoma Fissuratum
Erythema Multiforme
Elastosis Perforans Serpiginosa
Erythema Nodosum
Dermatomyositis
Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation
Dermatitis Herpetiformis
Epidermolysis Bullosa
Dyshidrotic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Dermatitis
Seborrheic Keratosis
Shingles
Skin Cancer
Solar Keratosis
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Stretch Marks
Stye
Sun Burn
Sun Damage
Telogen Effluvium
Tinea Capitis
Tinea Corporis
Tinea Cruris
Tinea Pedis
Tinea Versicolor
Urticaria Pigmentosa
Urticaria
 

 

 

 

 

Copyright © Health-Issues.org. All Rights Reserved.