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Pityriasis Lichenoides - Symptoms & Treatment


Pityriasis lichenoides is an infrequent cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. Pityriasis lichenoides cover a spectrum of clinical presentations ranging from acute papular lesions that hastily evolve into pseudovesicles and central necrosis to small, scaling, benign-appearing papules. There are two types: a short-lived form usually initiated in children (recognized as pityriasis lichenoides et varioliformis acuta (PLEVA)); and a more long-lasting form known as pityriasis lichenoides chronica (PLC). Pityriasis lichenoides most frequently affects adolescents and young adults, usually appearing prior to the age of 30. It appears to be vaguely more common in males. It is uncommon in infants and in old age.

Pityriasis Lichenoides emerge on the trunk, thighs, and arms. They seldom appear on the face, head or feet. The look of these rashes can make an individual's life sore. Rash often disappears within one to two years. A doctor or dermatologist can detect Pityriasis Lichenoides by conducting a skin biopsy of the affected area. Once the skin has been scraped, it repeatedly reveals a shiny brown surface. Pityriasis lichenoides chronica usually extend sub acutely, over days. It is also spread over the trunk, buttocks, and proximal extremities. Pityriasis Lichenoides may not forever respond to certain treatments and it can reappear when the treatment is stopped.

Causes of Pityriasis lichenoides

Some causes & risk factors of Pityriasis lichenoides are as follows:

  • Inflammatory reactions produce by infectious agents.
  • Epstein-Barr virus.
  • An immune-complex-mediated aversion vasculitis.
  • Parvovirus (fifth disease).

Symptoms of Pityriasis lichenoides

The possible symptoms of Pityriasis lichenoides includes:

  • At first a small pink papule arises that turns a reddish-brown color.
  • Typically a fine mica-like adherent scale close to the central spot develops. This can be peeled off to divulge a shiny, pinkish brown surface.
  • There may be a gentle illness with a fever.
  • It seldom affects the face but the spots are generally scattered on the trunk and limbs.

Treatments of Pityriasis lichenoides

Several most frequent treatments for Pityriasis lichenoides are as follows:

  • Topical steroids to decrease irritation. In more current years concerns raised about their side effect profile has led to the bigger use of nonsteroidal topical immunomodulators.
  • Topical immunomodulators for example tacrolimus or else pimecrolimus. Tacrolimus ointment applied twice each day has been used profitably to treat patients with PLC.
  • In more acute cases, medications for instance methotrexate and Zithromax are recommended for this condition.
  • Occasionally ultraviolet light treatment will recover pityriasis lichenoides.

 

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