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Squamous Cell Carcinoma - Symptoms & Treatment


Squamous cell carcinoma extends in the external layer of the skin (the epithelium). Some squamous cell carcinomas occur from diminutive sandpaper-like lesions called solar (sun) or actinic keratosis. It is probable for squamous cell carcinoma to extend to other areas of the body; thus, early treatment is imperative. Occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma differs with age, gender, race, geography, and genetics. The occurrence of SCC enlarges with age and the peak incidences are usually around 66 years old. Males are affected among SCC at a ratio of 2:1 in comparison to females.

Squamous cell carcinomas generally emerge as crusted or scaly patches on the skin with a red, swollen base, a growing tumor, or a non-healing ulcer. Caucasians are more probable to be affected, mainly those with fair Celtic skin, if chronically exposed to UV radiation. Squamous cell carcinomas can arise on any part of your body, but are normally on areas that are exposed to the sun, for instance your head and the backs of your hands. Because squamous cell carcinomas that reappear have a potential to extend to other parts of the body, it is very imperative that they be adequately treated the first time. But if they are left untreated for too long, a few may extend to further parts of the body, and this can be severe and tender.

Causes of Squamous cell carcinoma

Some causes & risk factors of Squamous cell carcinoma are as follows:

  • Contact to ultraviolet radiation.
  • A premalignant form known as actinic keratosis or solar keratosis.
  • Smoking.
  • Thermal burn scars.
  • Revelation to cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tar, soot, or shale.
  • An unusual hereditary disease called xeroderma pigmentosa.

Symptoms of Squamous cell carcinoma

The possible symptoms of Squamous cell carcinoma includes:

  • Ulcer or reddish skin sign that is measured growing.
  • Sign of chronic skin photodamage, for example various actinic keratoses (solar keratoses).
  • Frequently the tumor presents the same as an ulcerated wound with hard, raised edges.
  • The tumor grows quite leisurely.
  • On the lip, the tumor forms a tiny ulcer, which fails to cure and bleeds irregularly.

Treatments of Squamous cell carcinoma

The type of squamous cell carcinoma treatment generally depends on the size, location and assertiveness of the tumor. The tumor will repeatedly remove surgically. Mohs micrographic surgery may be required for large, ill-defined, deep or recurring tumors. Radiotherapy (dealing with X-rays) may be used if the squamous cell carcinoma is large or in an embarrassed place. Radiotherapy may too be used to alleviate symptoms when a squamous cell carcinoma has increase to different parts of the body. Chemotherapy is used for difficult periods of squamous cell carcinoma. The form of chemotherapy utilized is 13-cis-Retinoic acid and interferon-2A.

 

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